Project Learning Tree is a hands-on, interdisciplinary workshop, which introduces educators to dynamic activities and content for teaching forest ecosystems, plants, wildlife habitat and wise use of natural resources. The action-packed workshop includes content, lesson modeling, interactive activities, and opportunities for planning and exchange of teaching ideas.

plt-logoParticipants gain their own copies of the Project Learning Tree and Project WILD activity guides. Activities and content are correlated to Alaska State Content Standards.

All educators are invited to attend, including classroom teachers, homeschoolers, community and youth group leaders, and all those interested in learning innovative techniques for teaching about the natural world.

For more information contact anroeak@gmail.com.

 

GreenWorks! Grants Now Available

Deadline: September 30, 2017 for funding available in December, 2017
Do you have an idea for a service-learning project for your students to improve the environment at your school or in your community? Apply for a GreenWorks! grant from Project Learning Tree to help get your project off the ground. Maximum is $1,000. To be eligible, applicants must have attended a PLT workshop, either in-person or online and be connected to a school or youth organization.

For more information contact Haley Herbst, hherbst@plt.org
202-751-2440
Upcoming Changes to PLT.org
We will be launching PLT.org’s new online registration portal soon! These system upgrades include a new online form designed to collect PLT workshop participant information. Our tentative launch date for the beta version is July 3rd. We will then complete our testing and expect final systems will all be in place by the end of July.

Key things to know:

  • On July 3rd users will not be able to access the Student Pages and other resources for PLT activities, or the GreenSchools Investigations. These resources should be available for free access again starting July 4th.
E-unit-project-learning-tree New Curriculum and Professional Development
PLT has just released new supplemental curriculum constructed around the Next Generation Science Standards. Teachers can get Energy in Ecosystems for grades 3-5 or Carbon & Climate for grades 6-8 in conjunction with professional development – either by attending an in-person workshop in your state, or by purchasing an online training with an accompanying e-unit for $40 from shop.plt.org.

Green-tips-of-the-monthGreen Tips of the Month

According to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, a teacher or parent may be the driving force behind getting a school garden started, but once that teacher leaves the school, or the parent’s child graduates, gardens can wither away unless they have been well integrated into the school community. Here are some themes for success:

  • Organize a committee (or Green Team) to guide the garden rather than an individual who might leave or lose interest.
  • Include a plan for upkeep at the start of the project.
  • Connect to your curriculum and use the garden to teach all kinds of subjects (science, math, art, history, home economics, etc.)
  • Consider professional development sessions around horticulture for teachers who may be unfamiliar with gardening.
  • Reach out to neighborhood partners and seek reliable funding to sustain the garden.

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